Events

HackInTheBox Singapore (online) training

Bluer Oceans: Attacking BLE, NFC, HCE and more

Online (Singapore timezone)

HITB Conference

The training has been updated for remote hands-on participation. Each attendee will receive a hardware pack worth over 300 USD shipped to you in advance (please register as soon as possible!). The hardware includes among others Proxmark 3, Chameleon Tiny, a rooted Android smartphone, BLE sniffer, BLE dedicated training device and Raspberry Pi (details below). With the specially arranged setup (simulated, working exactly like real NFC and BLE devices), participants will be able to perform hands-on practical exercises remotely – BLE analysis (sniffing, intercepting), cloning and cracking multiple kinds of proximity cards, analysing BLE or NFC mobile applications – not only during training but also any time later.

HackInTheBox Amsterdam 2020 training [cancelled]

Bluer Oceans: Advanced Attacks Against BLE, NFC, HCE and more

Amsterdam

HITB Conference

Due to COVID-19 the event has been cancelled Organizer’s statement: Out of an abundance of caution for our speakers, crew, volunteers and of course attendees, we have decided that it is in everyone’s best interests to cancel HITBSecConf2020 – Amsterdam. More information: https://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2020ams/ Training description Bluetooth Low Energy is one of the most exploding IoT technologies. BLE devices surround us more and more – not only as wearables, toothbrushes and sex toys, but also smart locks, medical devices and banking tokens.

Cyberweek Abu Dhabi 2019 training

Blue Oceans: Advanced Attacks Against BLE, NFC, HCE and more

Abu Dhabi, UAE

Cyberweek

Bluetooth Low Energy is one of the most exploding IoT technologies. BLE devices surround us more and more - not only as wearables, toothbrushes and sex toys, but also smart locks, medical devices and banking tokens. Alarming vulnerabilities of these devices have been exposed multiple times recently. And yet, the knowledge on how to comprehesively assess their security seems very uncommon. Not to mention best practices guidelines, which are practically absent.